Guidance

Educational Podcasts and Videos Focusing on Dermatology

Don’t forget to log your learning points & reflections as part of your CPD. CQC are particularly keen to see any evidence of your learning and how you apply it.

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Basic Skin Lesion Recognition with a Dermoscope

Basic Skin Lesion Recognition without Dermoscopy

Diagnosis and Management of Common Rashes

 

Basic Skin Lesion Recognition with a Dermoscope

Aimed at GPs, ANPs & Allied Health Professionals in Primary Care. This session aims to give delegates a greater understanding of lesion diagnostics using a dermoscope

The dermoscope (some users prefer the term dermatoscope) is a portable, hand-held skin microscope which is now well proven as an invaluable tool in skin lesion recognition. It is often called ‘The dermatologist’s stethoscope’ and this is a fitting analogy because it is a simple piece of kit, deployed after history taking, inspection and palpation have been done, which gathers additional clinical data leading to better diagnostic decisions. Some training is required.

To become a real expert with the dermoscope takes time and mentoring, but clinical trials have shown that GPs can significantly improve their ability to recognise skin cancers after just one day of training. The Primary Care Dermatology Society has long advocated that GPs and practice nurses should use dermoscopy primarily to support the diagnosis of everyday benign lesions (warts, banal naevi, haemangiomas etc) to avoid patients with such lesions being sent needlessly on cancer pathways.

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Basic Skin Lesion Recognition without Dermoscopy

Aimed at GPs, ANPs & Allied Health Professionals in Primary Care. This session aims to give delegates a greater understanding of lesion diagnostics

Skin cancer, and the fear of skin cancer, has been steadily increasing world wide in predominantly white populations for at least half a century. Melanoma and other primary cutaneous malignancies kill around 3,000 people a year in Britain, more than road traffic accidents, cervical cancer and meningitis combined, so it’s an important public health matter calling for an active response. GPs are asked to review patients’ moles and other skin lesions daily, despite having had little training in lesion diagnostics. Fear of missing a melanoma leads to excess referrals and thousands of obviously benign lesions are referred on the urgent skin cancer pathway annually.

This session will discuss the natural history of common and important skin lesions, key factors in the history, inspection and palpation and also red flag warning signs that will help the working GP make safe and efficient decisions in the surgery. The session will assume no prior knowledge, look at basic principles and consider each lesion type with dozens of examples to showcase the range of lesion appearances, with particular emphasis on how to confidently reassure the patient with a harmless skin lesion without missing a melanoma.

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Diagnosis and Management of Common Rashes

Aimed at GPs & Allied Health Professionals in Primary Care. This session aims to give delegates a greater understanding of identifying common rashes and when referrals are necessary.

It is thought that skin problems make up to 20% of GPs’ clinical work load but barely 1% of their training (if that). The subject can be intimidating, with over 1,000 known rashes (maybe 4,000 if all variants are considered) but it can be simplified for the working GP by taking a systematic approach and concentrating on the five common skin problems. These are: eczema/dermatitis in all it’s forms, psoriasis, infections (fungal, bacterial, viral and infestations), acne and urticaria. The GP who is confident with these 5 everyday skin disease groups will do very well indeed, and it is not that difficult if you understand the basic underlying disease principles and a few simple rules.

Common rashes will be considered with a brief look at the underlying biology, history and examination and rational therapeutic approaches. Uncommon variants, special cases and when to refer will be discussed. The occasional skin emergency needing urgent referral will also be considered, and educational resources mentioned.

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Last Reviewed Date
07/12/2023